GARÇON BOTTLES

 
 
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At Garçon Wines we take pleasure in delivering a message in a bottle. And it can be summed up in three words: elegance plus convenience.

A majestic homage to the classic bottle shapes familiar to wine lovers everywhere, our bottles are both stylish and sturdy. Their slender rectangular forms stand proudly taller than conventional glass bottles, adding a note of distinction to your dinner table and a topic for discussion.

But don’t be fooled by their delicate demeanour: Garçon bottles are durable and dependable. They’re designed to endure the jolting and jarring of the bumpiest delivery service and won’t break in the post. Our bottles always reach you in the finest condition.

And if that doesn’t uncork your bottled-up emotions, then the great wines that our bottles bring into your home certainly will. In fact, Garçon bottles are tasteful in every sense.

 
 
 

SHAPES

 
 
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Designing a revolutionary new bottle is thirsty work. At Garçon Wines we’ve spared no effort to bring you a superior product. We set our hearts on developing a style fit for the 21st century that also invokes the millennial history of winemaking.

We’ve worked hard to ensure that the materials we use in our bottles are the most safe and sound available. And we’ve taken every care to ensure our customers drink to the health of our planet: Garçon bottles can be recycled to safeguard our environment.

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Bordeaux bottle 

Our Bordeaux bottle bears a heavy weight of responsibility on its characteristic shoulders. That’s because the original Bordeaux bottle – designed soon after its Burgundian cousin – quickly became the most used wine bottle in the world. Given such a pedigree, the Garçon Wines version of this design classic simply exudes class

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Burgundy bottle

Our Burgundy bottle pays tribute to a real pioneer. First blown by glassmakers in the 19th century, the Burgundy bottle with its curved sides soon became ubiquitous among producers of red and white wine. It conquered the world – and at Garçon Wines we intend to follow in its footsteps.

 
 
 

MATERIALS

 
 
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p.e.t.

It’s a real mouthful, but polyethylene terephthalate is just another way of referring to the glass-like plastic that is used in many drinks bottles. Known as “PET”, this shatterproof material has been used to bottle wine for years.

Totally safe for holding food and drinks, it’s flexible enough to withstand the knocks that would easily crack a glass bottle. It’s crystal clear to resemble glass, but we can add colour as required. It has the advantage of being light, making it ideal for deliveries. At one-ninth the weight of an equivalent glass container, this keeps down the cost of shipping for suppliers and postage for consumers.

A lighter bottle is much better for the environment because transporting it generates lower carbon dioxide emissions. Add to this the fact that it’s 100% recyclable, and you’ve got a bottle that’s genuinely gentle on our planet. 


Recycled P.E.T.

Alongside the brand new or “virgin” PET being used for the first time in our bottles, we also employ recycled PET to ensure our production is as environmentally sustainable as possible. Known as PCR (post-consumer recycled) PET, this retains all of the polyester’s strength, clarity and mechanical properties – but allows Garçon Wines to use plastics much more efficiently.

Big drinks brands like Coca-Cola mix up to 50% of recycled PET with the virgin polyester in their bottles in order to hit recycling targets, but we’re far more ambitious. We’ll raise the bar by using 100% of recycled plastic from the outset, creating what green champions call a “closed-loop” supply chain in which there’s zero waste.


We’ll also include a special “oxygen scavenger” to give our bottles a much longer shelf-life than other wine-packaging solutions. When you drink wine from a Garçon bottle, you can do so confident that it poses no threat to our environment.

 
 
 

RECYCLING

 
 
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At Garçon Wines we take our responsibilities seriously. Some plastic bottles have made the headlines for all the wrong reasons as careless producers and consumers pay little heed to their duty to recycle. We’re very different: every single Garçon bottle can be recycled.

Just as the makers of glass bottles learned that resources are finite and glass can be reused – keeping down costs and saving valuable materials – so we aim to ensure that the material in our bottles is used over and over again. We take a sober view of waste. It makes sense to do so environmentally and commercially: businesses that don’t soon wither on the vine.

 
 
 

ENVIRONMENT

 
 
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Employing material that can be recycled isn’t the only way that we’re helping the environment. Garçon bottles offer a radical way to reduce the carbon footprint created by the transportation of wine. We’re driving beneficial change in the wine industry supply chain.

By supplying bottles that are far lighter than their glass equivalents, we allow wine producers, shipping and delivery companies, retailers and consumers to cut the amount of carbon dioxide they generate as wine moves from barrel to home – and to save money in the process.

Indeed, it’s been estimated that reducing the weight of the 1 billion bottles of wine consumed in the UK alone each year by as much as is practically possible could save 90,000 tons of CO2. Moreover, these savings can be magnified by the shape of our bottles, which allow much more wine to be stored and shipped in the same space than before.

 
 
 

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY 

 

 
 
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It goes without saying that innovative companies need to safeguard their ideas in order to protect consumers against poor imitations. At Garçon Wines we understand the value of originality more than most, and so we’ve taken responsible steps to protect our greatest asset – our creativity.

We’ve sought and been granted intellectual property protection for an extensive portfolio of registered designs for our slimline wine bottles in 35 of the world’s main wine drinking and producing countries.

It’s the right thing to do – after all, no one would ever try to copy a masterpiece, would they?